India’s Tests against England and Australia not fixed – ICC

An Al Jazeera documentary dated 2018, titled 'Cricket's Match Fixers' released on October 21, claimed that India's Test matches against England 2016 and against Australia in 2017 in Ranchi were fixed.

The International Cricket Council (ICC), in its press release quashed claims of Test matches being fixed that India played against England in 2016 and against Australia in 2017 in Ranchi.

It further clarified that no credible and sufficient sources were found against five people involved in the film, thus rejecting the claims as those were implausible. An alleged bookie Aneel Munnawar was seen in the documentary.

“No charges will be brought under the ICC Anti-Corruption Code against any of the five Participants to the Code who featured in the programme due to insufficient credible and reliable evidence,” the ICC said.

According to ICC’s Press release –

The programme alleged that two matches were fixed: India v England in Chennai in 2016 and India v Australia in Ranchi in 2017. To assess whether the passages of play highlighted in the programme were unusual in any way, the ICC engaged four independent betting and cricketing specialists to analyse the claims. All four concluded that the passages of play identified in the programme as being allegedly fixed were entirely predictable, and therefore implausible as a fix.

Alex Marshall, ICC General Manager – Integrity said: “We welcome the reporting of alleged corrupt activity within cricket as there is no place for such conduct in our sport, but we also need to be satisfied there is sufficient evidence to sustain charges against Participants. In the case of the claims aired in this programme, there are fundamental weaknesses in each of the areas we have investigated that make the claims unlikely and lacking in credibility, a viewpoint that has been corroborated by four independent experts.

“On the basis of the programme, the Participants to the Code who were filmed appear to have behaved in a questionable manner, however, we have been unable to assess the full context of the conversations that took place beyond what was seen on screen versus what the Participants claim actually happened. This combined with the absence of any other credible evidence means there are insufficient grounds to bring charges under the ICC Anti-Corruption Code.”

“Should any new substantial evidence come to light I will re-examine the case. But at present I am comfortable with the conclusion of the investigation and the thoroughness with which it was undertaken.”

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