Orlando Magic Team Profile and Analysis: NBA Team Eastern Conference Southeast Division

One of the three divisions in the Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association is the Southeast Division (NBA). There are five clubs in the division: the Atlanta Hawks, Charlotte Hornets, Miami Heat, Orlando Magic, and Washington Wizards.

The division was established when the league increased from 29 to 30 teams at the beginning of the 2004–05 season with the arrival of the Charlotte Bobcats. Three divisions were created in each conference as a result of league realignment. The Hawks, Bobcats, Heat, Magic, and Wizards were the first five teams to join the Southeast Division.

In contrast to the Heat, Magic and Wizards, who joined from the Atlantic Division, the Hawks joined from the Central Division. With the start of the 2014–15 season, the Bobcats changed their name to the Hornets, taking on the 1988–2002 history of the original Hornets. The now-New Orleans Pelicans utilised the Hornets name from 2002 until 2013.

The Heat have won the most Southeast Division championships (11), followed by the Magic (four), Hawks (2) and Wizards (1). From 2011 to 2014, the Heat set a record by winning the Southeast Division four times in a row. Miami won the Southeast Division in each of its three championship seasons (2006, 2012, and 2013). The Miami Heat are the reigning division champs. Miami and Orlando, Florida’s two state-based teams, won a combined 10 division titles in a row from 2004 through 2014; this trend was finally interrupted by Atlanta, which won 60 victories in the 2015 campaign. Four of the five teams in the division made up half of the eight playoff teams in 2010 and 2014, respectively.

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Orlando Magic

A professional basketball team from the United States, the Orlando Magic is based in Orlando, Florida. The Eastern Conference Southeast Division of the National Basketball Association (NBA) is where the Magic play. NBA luminaries, including Shaquille O’Neal, Penny Hardaway, Grant Hill, Tracy McGrady, Dwight Howard, Jameer Nelson, Rashard Lewis, and Nikola Vuevi, have all suited up for the team during the course of their careers. The organisation was founded in 1989 as an expansion franchise. The team has appeared in the NBA Playoffs 16 times in 32 seasons as of 2021, and in 1995 and 2009, it twice reached the NBA Finals. Orlando has had the second-highest winning percentage among the four expansion teams that were added to the league in 1988 and 1989.

The initial Magic attire was created by Orlando advertising firm The Advertising Works, which is overseen by its president Doug Minear. The wordmark “Magic” with a star in place of the letter A and a basketball surrounded by stars make up the logo, which was developed after discussions with Walt Disney World artists and more than 5000 proposals from throughout the nation. Even after the logo was changed to include a basketball that resembled a comet in 2000, stars would still be the dominant component. The black and gold of Pat Williams’ alma mater, Wake Forest, was initially proposed, but this was rejected due to a number of reasons, including the fact that the nearby college, UCF, used the same colour scheme. In Minear’s colour scheme, black would still be the dominant hue, as it is in the schemes of 16 other NBA teams.

Head Coach: Jamahl Mosley

Assistant Coach:   

  • Lionel Chalmers
  • Nate Tibbetts
  • Dale Osbourne
  • Bret Brielmaier
  • Jesse Mermuys
  • Dylan Murphy

Trainer: Ernest Eugene

City: Orlando (Florida)

Population: 287,442 people (2,608,147 people in the metropolitan area)

Arena: Amway Center (18,846 seats)

Owner/s: DeVos Family

General Manager: Jeff Weltman

Team Records:

NBA titles: 0

Conference titles: 2

Division titles: 6

Playoff Appearances: 16

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